The Son of Man

Ok, my math skills are kinda weak, so I need some help here.  0.5 + 0.5 = 1?  Got it!  1 + 1 = 2?  Alright, on a roll!  So when does 1 + 1 ever equal 1?  When Jesus Christ was both human and God at the same time.

This isn’t a study about the divinity of Jesus, I think that most people visiting this blog already believe that Jesus was indeed God the Son in the flesh on this earth (John 1:1-2), if not, then shoot me an email and we’ll talk.  But, rather I want to take a look at Jesus, the Son of Man.

1. He was born just like you and me, though not under the same circumstances.  You, like me, we’re most likely born in a hospital.  A hospital that was clean and sterile, (mostly) free from germs.  Also, there was probably a nurse tending to your mother and a doctor that specializes in childbirth there to care for you when you were finally born.  Not Jesus, He was born in a stable, His first bed was a food trough that a horse probably ate out of minutes before He was born.  But still, He was brought into this world through a human birth (Luke 2:6-7).

2. He lived a normal life just like you and me.  Well, maybe not normal, I don’t remember teaching the elders of my congregation anything new when I was only 12 years old (Luke 2:41-51).  But what I mean to say is that Jesus worked for a living.  Mark 6:3  tells us that He was a carpenter, not an easy job even on the best of days.  His hands were calloused and he worked in the hot sun.  The average July temperature in Bethlehem today is 86° / 60% humidity, with a “nice” desert breeze.

3. He was tempted just like us in every way (Hebrews 4:15).  That really speaks for itself, you know yourself and you know the things that tempt you on a daily basis.  Try smashing your thumb with a hammer, like you know Jesus probably did given His profession, and not wanting to say something inappropriate.  But more than that, His God side (if you will) was tempted as well (Luke 4:1-12).

4. He had emotions just like you and me.  In Matthew 21:12-13 He was angered by the buying/selling and money changing going on in the temple where it shouldn’t have been.  And He cried when His friend Lazarus died, even though He knew beforehand that Lazarus would be raised from the dead (John 11:35).

5. He died, not at all like you and me.  He died FOR you and me.

And why did God the Son leave His Father’s side in Heaven to live and die for us?  So that He could mediate the difference in God’s expectations and our human failings (1 Timothy 2:5, Hebrews 2:17-18).  The God of the Old Testament is the same God that we worship today, He has not changed.  His law was perfect, but humans are not.  When God would have destroyed us time and time again for sinning against him like he has done in the past (Genesis 6:17, Genesis 19:24-25, Numbers 16:31-35, etc), Jesus can say, stop!  And tell the Father that He has been there Himself, and that we as humans are doing the best that we can (Hebrews 2:17-18).  And if we continue to do the best we can and try to live a sinless life God is faithful to forgive (1 John 1:5-10), all thanks to Jesus Christ, our mediator.

Do not be conformed to this world!

Let me introduce you to King Josiah.  He was only 8 years old when he was made the King of Judah, when he was 26 years old he found out that he and his kingdom were not right with God, and he set out to change that. 

Josiah’s story of reform is found in 2 Kings 22-23.  Josiah was already doing right by God, he had workmen and the high priest, Hilkiah, sent to the house of the Lord and they were repairing it.  While there, Hilkiah found the Book of the Law which had been lost while Judah was busy serving false gods.  Josiah sent Shaphan, his secretary, to the house of the Lord to send money and check up on Hilkiah and the workmen.  When he arrived Hilkiah gave the Book of the Law to Shaphan and he brought it back to the king. When Josiah heard the Law he was angry that the past kings of Judah had not kept the Law of God and made God angry with the kingdom.  Then, 26 year old King Josiah began to destroy every idol, altar, and chapel of the false gods in Judah. 

How can we apply this today?  Let’s read Romans 12:2.

Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.

King Josiah saw that his kingdom had conformed to the world, they had been worshiping the idols of the land they were supposed to conquer.  When Josiah heard the Law read to him, his mind was renewed by the Law, and he set out to transform his kingdom to be acceptable and pleasing to God. 

We too must study God’s word so that we can renew our minds and transform the kingdom that is our heart to be acceptable and pleasing to God.

The Nephilim

I’m reading the Bible through, and thought I would blog about some topics that I find interesting along the way.

The first mention of the Nephilim is in Genesis 6:4.

 The Nephilim were on the earth in those days, and also afterward, when the sons of God came in to the daughters of man and they bore children to them. These were the mighty men who were of old, the men of renown.

There are several theories about the origin of the Nephilim and what they actually were.  The most probable to me is they were the offspring of a union between two differing peoples.  They may have differed in physical traits, beliefs, or even social status.  It may have been that Godly people married un-Godly and their offspring were evil in God’s sight.

Another theory is that the Nephilim were offspring off angels and humans.  One branch of this theory is that the angels were rebellious fallen angels who found humans to be beautiful and had children with them.  Another related idea is that the union of angel and human was sanctioned by God.  I don’t believe the God would sanction such a union because He created marriage between a human man and woman (Genesis 2:18-25), also Genesis 1:11, 1:21, and 1:25 says that God’s creations reproduce after their own kind.  Angels are heavenly beings and humans earthly (although in God’s image), this is a thing that I don’t think God would allow to happen.

The Nephilim aren’t mentioned again until the Hebrew spies are sent into Canaan to scout the land.  The more faithless of the spies said this about the people of Canaan in Numbers 13:32-33.

So they brought to the people of Israel a bad report of the land that they had spied out, saying, “The land, through which we have gone to spy it out, is a land that devours its inhabitants, and all the people that we saw in it are of great height. And there we saw the Nephilim (the sons of Anak, who come from the Nephilim), and we seemed to ourselveslike grasshoppers, and so we seemed to them.”

But in truth the people of Israel wouldn’t know what the Nephilim looked like, because they were all destroyed in the flood.  They would only know of them by stories passed down by Noah and his sons.  My personal belief is that perhaps the Nephilim were used as scary stories by the Hebrews and when the spies saw the giants of Canaan, think Goliath of Gath, they immediately thought back to the stories they were told growing up.  Of course this is pure speculation on my part, as the Bible doesn’t mention any more about the Nephilim than what has been quoted in these few scriptures.

I just want to make note again that these are human ideas, some of others and some of mine, there is very little said about the Nephilim in God’s word.

“Camp” Songs

We watched some videos of singing someone took at Challenge Youth Conference(CYC), in Gatlinburg, TN.  We took our youth group there a few times before I joined the military.  I really miss singing these type of songs like we sung during devo nights at Faulkner University and at Palmetto Bible Camp.  By the way, they are totally appropriate to sing in our worship services at home as well.

What are some of your favorite “camp” songs?